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Educating Your Staff to Spot Social Engineering


spot social engineering

One of the newest techniques used by hackers to gain private data is social engineering. This method uses human psychology to gather data rather than simply attacking a system. When you consider it, this approach is quite brilliant because it avoids having to go through strict network security. Someone will literally hand the information to the hackers on a silver platter if they can trick even one employee, and they will take over the organization’s entire system. That is why it is important to train your employees on how to spot social engineering.

Businesses need to be aware of how social engineering can seriously jeopardize security. Over 90% of data breaches, according to reports, result from social engineering. Of these cases, 54% involve phishing scams. The good news is that you can avoid most social engineering threats by training your staff members.

Common Social Engineering Methods

There is a lot to cover when teaching employees how to spot social engineering. Discussing the most common strategies would be a reasonable place to start so that staff members can identify and steer clear of them.

The most popular technique is phishing because it is simple to carry out. It produces incredibly fruitful outcomes, at least for the hackers. This technique involves sending emails that trick recipients into clicking a harmful link or disclosing private information without realizing it.

Pretexting is when a hacker manipulates a pretext or made-up scenario to acquire the victim’s trust as part of a more complex social engineering attack strategy. The hacker might trick the victim into disclosing information for something in the quid pro quo attack. Another common way to spot social engineering involves tailgating or piggybacking, in which the victim unwittingly grants the hacker access to a secure site.

Training of Employees is Important to Spot Social Engineering

As you can expect, if your staff wasn’t properly trained or aware of the hazards to spot them, these social engineering tactics would be considerably simpler to implement. The $100 million phishing fraud on Google and Facebook is an example of the immense harm that could result. A group of hackers repeatedly sent phishing emails from 2013 to 2015 to Google and Facebook workers, instructing them to deposit money into phony accounts. Through this technique, they could gain more than $100 million.

Now, even if your company doesn’t bring in that much money, you can still fall victim. Hackers attack small firms on a large scale these days. Every employee of your company, from customer service representatives to top executives, might be a target, so you need to implement training across the board.

Best Practices to Spot Social Engineering for Employees

There are various ways to teach your staff about how to spot social engineering. A thorough training session works best in a traditional classroom setting, whether in person or online. But a single seminar is not sufficient, which is why we also advise frequent refreshers.

Unannounced phishing simulations are excellent for gauging how much a worker has learned. You’d be astonished at how many individuals perform admirably in theory but cannot recognize the truth when it is staring them in the face in their email. Your staff will learn to be more watchful going forward after experiencing being bitten during a simulated attack.

Final Reflections

If everyone in the organization is adequately aware of the risks and knows what to do if an attack is successful, organizations can attain a high level of protection against social engineering. Along with the many training techniques you’ll use, we strongly suggest that you download our infographic, “The Top 10 Steps to Take If You Think You Have Been Hacked.” Post it on the bulletin boards in each department by printing it out. Ensure that every member of your staff receives a copy as well.

Call us if you’d like to learn more about how to spot social engineering and how to prevent becoming a victim. We can keep your business safe from the prying eyes of cybercriminals and bring you up to speed on the most recent preventive measures.

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